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20120926
20121004
Search Results 0 to 41 of about 42 (some duplicates have been removed)
. >> reporter: from there, romney turned to education policy at a forum sponsored by nbc news. >> we have proven that sending a lot of money to failed schools to pay the same teachers to do the same things will not make any difference. the real key is leadership in drawing the best and brightest to the profession, giving them the right incentives, promoting the very best, helping our students have discipline in the classroom, insisting on the participation of parents. >> reporter: the candidate new york city stop came as another poll. this one from the "washington post" found ohio swinging toward the obama column. no republican has won the white house without ohio. with that in mind, romney and running mate paul ryan began a bus tour through ohio this afternoon. >> sreenivasan: the u.s. supreme court upheld west virginia's congressional redistricting plan today. critics of the redistricting had argued that the populations within newly drawn districts were too far out of balance, but the supreme court reversed a lower court ruling and said the state legislatures was correct in trying to keep coun
nicholas kristof and sheryl wudunn. >> once you give a woman education and a chance to work, she can astound you. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: three months after upholding president obama's health care law, the supreme court is back with a docket that may even rival last year's term for drama. the justices will decide a case on affirmative action in higher education, and are expected to take up disputes on same-sex marriage, civil rights law, and more. the term opened today with arguments in another controversial case: whether businesses can be sued in u.s. courts for human rights violations that occur in foreign countries. marcia coyle of the "national law journal" was in the courtroom this morning, and i
will be in school, in education and therefore are not looking for work. so maybe it will be 50% of the 30% of the youth that is actually looking for work. so i'm not trying to minimize the problem, there is a significant risk of actually having a lost generation in europe, but the real number of spanish youth unemployment is not 50% of all spanish youth, for instance. it is considerably lower. but still a tremendous problem. >> ifill: and how many of those who are not looking are discouraged workers? we've had that conversation here in this country. >> absolutely. i mean, there's no doubt people suffer from a lot of the same problems that we have here in the united states. >> ifill: is there also a problem with coming to some sort of resolution as far as germany and other bank-- money-- money givers go? that somebody else is going to get in line. that if you give greece money, spain is going to be standing there. if you give spain money portugal could be standing there. >> there is this problem of political moral hazard going on which is really, as you say, well, if you give us, let's say
one-room schoolhouses to educate its kids. guglich says those days are long gone. >> within the last ten years, we had to start servicing not only the farming community but now the oil community. >> reporter: guglich expects his student body to double in size in the coming years as oil workers bring their families to williston and more affordable housing becomes available. today real estate prices here are on par with places like new york city and san francisco. new residents are routinely paying more than $2,000 a month in rent. those prices were a problem for guglich, who needed to increase his staff dramatically this year in a state that ranks next to last in the country in teacher pay. >> we hired 14 new teachers and we were able to find housing for most of them, but we still have five teachers who don't have permanent housing. some are staying on couches, some are staying in homes that are in the process of being sold, so they are sleeping on air mattresses, kind of like squatting. >> reporter: one of those squatting teachers is melanie burroughs, who recently moved to williston
was in education in new york state. they have a pretty good retirement program. which i had, of course. so i had a good retirement, social security, compensation check from the veterans, a small one. so i was pretty well set financially to take care of myself. >> sreenivasan: then the couple suffered a string of devastating medical problems. georgia was the first to have to live full time at the nursing home but she fought it tooth and nail. >> i really had a breakdown when they told me i was staying. my heart was set on getting better. i tried and tried and tried. one day we had a meeting with, you know, everyone that was involved. they convinced me that i was number one it was very hard to take, i would never walk again. i can't even stand up completely. >> sreenivasan: their daughter mary ellen became their primary caregiver. she remembers well the stress she was under when a series of serious medical conditions nearly took her dad down. >> there were countless trips in and out of johns hopkins. while i'm taking care of him i'm also still taking my mom to and from her doctors' appointments. i
to see improvements in education. policy has been stalled for an extended period and a changing world. and we need to catch up. we have to prepare not just for having next year be good but the next ten years, the next 20 years. >> muhamed el-erian, you spoke about the monies that's sitting on the sidelines and i hear ken rogoff referring to that too. with is it going to take that shake that loose to make business owners feel that it's a good thing to invest. >> it's going to take what ken said and critically, it's about a number of items that have to be addressed simultaneously. you know we like this notion. maybe there's a shortcut, maybe there is a killer app, maybe there is this one thing. well, there isn't. it's taken us years to get in this mess. it's going to take us years to get out. and we only get out through simultaneous progress on a number of areas. so ken spoke to fiscal reform. he spoke to infrastructure. he spoke to education. i would add labor retraining and retooling. and i would also add fixing the credit pipes of this economy. so it's a long list. it requires simult
and the-- see, the president has a number of discreet constituents-- latinos, working women, college-educated women-- to whom he has spoken. the thing. a national debate, you're speaking to everybody at the same time. there's no demographic cliques or subgroups. it's everybody. that's consider i think debates are so important. >> woodruff: we're popping the popcorn. we're on the edge of our seats. we'll see both of you in three hours. we will be back at 9:00 p.m. eastern for special coverage of this debate but our effort effoe ongoing online. we will have a live scream where you can watch the debate and live analysis from our team. we're send our "newshour" hat-cam to a debate watch party here in washington. following the debate, "newshour" political editor christina belland tony will be talking to undecide voters at a google-plus hang out >> ifill: still to come on the "newshour": rough flying for american airlines; the pope's butler on trial in rome; chasing the early voters in iowa; a medical breakthrough for critically ill infants and jim lehrer on past debates. but first, with the other
education piece that will continue to be rolled out. you know, and the fact that poll workers can actually still ask people for i.d.s although they don't have to produce it in order to get a regular ballot. we think at the end of the day that the pennsylvania state constitution really does prevent this kind of law from going forward because as the supreme court said it really wantedded to see, you know, make sure that there's no disenfranchisement. we think that there was 760,000 people that the state estimated were going to be impacted by this law. in fact, they have won because they will have access to the ballot in november. >> suarez: representative metcalfe, when is the next biggie leches in pennsylvania after november 6? and will you have time to answer some of ms. browne dianis' complaints? >> we don't need to answer her complaints. the constitution is very clear. this is the responsibility of the legislature. it stands within our area of responsibility to set this process up for the election and ultimately the way the courts have written these decisions, written these opinions it's
Search Results 0 to 41 of about 42 (some duplicates have been removed)

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